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Sat: 8:00-7:30
Sun: 8:00-7:30

Allentown Railers Page

LVSA website

ECTB website

Sponsors



All other interested Sponsors please call (610) 351-0013.

Packages

The LVBA Staff has worked very hard to create packages at an affordable monthly payment while packing in as much value as possible. All packages will be explained during your son’s evaluation. If you haven’t signed up for your Evaluation please sign up today!

College Recruiting

What grades do I need to play in college?

There are minimum academic requirements to compete in both Division I and Division II athletics. Division I uses a sliding scale – as your GPA gets higher, your minimum required test scores get lower, and vice-versa. You should still work as hard as possible to keep your GPA high – test scores can be a wild card and you don’t want to depend on a high score on a high-pressure standardized test for your academic eligibility.

Remember that these are just minimum requirements – you will still need to be admitted to any college where you want to play. Make sure to check the admissions sections on the websites of specific schools you are interested in to see the typical GPA and test scores of admitted students.

Division I Requirements:
A. Graduate from high school

B. Pass these 16 core courses:
4 years English
3 years Math (Algebra I or higher)
2 years Natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school)
2 years Social Science
1 year Your choice of additional English OR Math OR Science
4 years Any of above OR foreign language OR non-doctrinal religion/philosophy

C. Satisfy the GPA and test score requirements on the Division I sliding scale
Depending on your test scores, you will need a GPA somewhere between 2.0 and 3.55 to qualify. Regardless of your test scores and your athletic ability, you cannot play Division I athletics with a GPA below 2.0. For instance, with a GPA of 2.75, you would need either an SAT score of 720 or an ACT sum score of 59 to qualify.

For purposes of qualifying for athletics, your GPA will be calculated using only the 16 core courses listed above. Physical education and other electives not listed will not count towards your qualifying GPA.

You can use either the SAT or the ACT to fulfill your standardized testing requirement. A note on the ACT: the qualification requirements do not use the conventional ACT “composite” score (from 1-36) but a “sum” score. The composite score averages the four ACT sections (English, Mathematics, Reading, Science), and that is how you will usually see ACT scores written. The sum score that Division I uses is the total of the four sections (they are 36 points apiece) and so is on a scale from 4 to 144.

Division II Requirements:
Unlike Division I, Division II does not use a sliding scale for academic eligibility.

A. Graduate from high school

B. Earn a 2.0 GPA or better in these 14 core courses:
4 years English
2 years Math (Algebra I or higher)
2 years Natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school)
2 years Social Science
1 year Your choice of additional English OR Math OR Science
3 years Any of above OR foreign language OR non-doctrinal religion/philosophy

C. Earn an SAT score of at least 820 OR an ACT sum score of at least 68.

Division III Requirements
Division III does not have a uniform set of eligibility requirements. Each Division III school determines their own academic requirements for their athletes.

NAIA Requirements:
A. Graduate from high school
B. Meet 2 of 3 of these requirements:
1. 860 or better on the SAT OR an ACT composite score of 18 or better (see explanation of ACT scores above)
2. Overall high school GPA of 2.0 or better
3. Graduate in the upper 50% of your high school graduating class


College Recruiting Letters/E-Mails

Introductory Letter/E-Mail to College Baseball Coach



• First impressions are important.


• The a hand written letter will be more peronalize to the coach. If your handwriting is not easily legible you should probably type the letter.


• The player should write (or type) the letter. Mom or Dad can check it for content, neatness, clarity and spelling.


• Keep the letter brief .... this is just the first contact .... hopefully you will have plenty of time to sell yourself later. If your letter takes more than 1 to 2 minutes to read through it is too long.


• Do not address or start your letter "Dear Coach" To a coach this is like getting a letter addressed to "Occupant" or "Dear Resident".


Click Here For Sample Introductory Letter


Player Profile Form


Sample Player Profile
Video Letter to College Baseball Coach


This is a sample of a letter to include when sending a college coach or professional scout a videotape of a high school player. This letter assumes that a prior introductory letter has been sent to the college baseball coach.

Click Here For Sample Video Letter



Schedule Letter/E-Mail to College Baseball Coach


This is a sample letter to send along with a copy of your fall, spring (high school) or summer schedule. It is important to send college coaches copies of your schedules, in order for them to watch you in real game situations. Many coaches will not offer scholarship money to a player they have not seen play in a game. It is important to keep the coaches aware of when and where you will be playing .

Click Here For Sample Schedule Letter

Sample Recruitment Video #1 | Sample Recruitment Video #2